Living without power

Many hurricane-related deaths result from accidents after the storm. Among the dangers: fires from candles and gas canisters; carbon-monoxide poisoning from generators; traumatic injuries from power tools, nails and chainsaws; and heat-related injuries from no air-conditioning.

Turn off your circuit breakers, disconnect all electrical appliances that are still plugged in, and turn off all wall switches.

When resetting circuit breakers, do not attempt to touch them if you are wet or are standing in water or on a wet floor. Wear dry, rubber-soled shoes and stand on something dry and non-conductive, such as a dry piece of wood or wooden furniture.

DO NOT STAND IN WATER when using switches, unplugging anything, or touching an electrical appliance, wiring or tools.

Be careful walking around your home. Loose electrical wires, ceilings and beams might fall.

If your roof or windows leak, water in your walls and ceiling may come into contact with electrical wiring.

Don’t use candles.

Do not use electrical or gas appliances until they’re dry. Replace any appliances, gas control valves, electric circuit breakers, ground-fault interrupters and fuses that have been in water.

You may need a licensed electrical contractor to survey your house and make repairs, depending on the damage.

If the meter, the box that holds it, or any of the external pipes and wires associated with the meter are missing, bent or otherwise damaged, FPL may not be able to reconnect service until a licensed electrician makes the necessary repairs.

If someone in your home is dependent on electric-powered, life-sustaining medical equipment, review your emergency plan for backup power or make arrangements to relocate.

Open all doors and windows so noxious smells and gases can escape. Check for gas leaks.

Don’t smoke indoors until everything has dried.

Never use a charcoal grill inside the home or garage.

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