Grill safety

Grills are convenient, but can be dangerous

When the power goes out, you may be cooking on a charcoal, propane or natural gas grill, or a hibachi.

Never leave grill unattended. Keep children away! Don’t grill near leaves, wood or other flammable objects.

CHARCOAL GRILLS

Safety first! Grills can kill. Charcoal emits carbon monoxide. It’s odorless and colorless and deadly. Grills emit it even if the lid is on, and they can emit it even if coals appear completely out. After Hurricane Wilma in 2005, a mother in a family of three died from carbon monoxide poisoning after a smoldering grill was left in their Mangonia Park kitchen.

Grill food in a well-ventilated area. NEVER bring a grill inside a home, camper or tent. Do NOT grill in a garage, carport or shed.

Douse coals with water, stir and douse again. They are out when they are cool to the touch.

Stock up early. Store in a dry area, away from flame.

PROPANE GRILLS

Fill your propane tanks now! Lines will be long once the storm approaches. If you have a big tank, have it filled regularly during the season. If you use small tanks, have two or even three full ones on hand.

When refilling, have supplier check for dents, damage, rust or leaks. At home, check hoses for leaks, kinks or deterioration.

If tank appears damaged after a storm, don’t use it.

Keep propane tanks outside the home, but secure them so they don’t become missiles during the storm.

Use and store propane cylinders outdoors in an upright position after the storm. Do not store spare tanks close to a hot grill.

Don’t tamper with supply lines or permanent connections.

Keep grill lid open until you’re sure it’s lit.

Always make sure valves and dials are shut tight on both grill and tank. Escaping propane fumes, easy to detect by their strong odor, are deadly to breathe in quantity and can explode. If you smell gas, clear the area and seek help.

Never smoke around propane!

MORE INFORMATION

Florida Propane Gas Safety, Education and Research Council

Propane Education & Research Council

Consumer Product Safety Commission grill safety brochure